Jump to content

weight


Mike Alston
 Share

Recommended Posts

Mike: 

The difference in weight between a standard TTC base and a Proline TTC base is very slight. The concept behind the ProLine bases is that they can be tweaked to a wider variety of degrees for all types of players on both sides of the ball. 

You can use the rookie fast ProLines to create receivers and defensive backs who scream down the field with very little tweaking required. 

You can use the rookie strong ProLines (these are quite popular) to get a good balance of speed and bring in some strength, and you can see these used on everyone from running backs to defensive ends. 

The TTC Fast prolines are great for safeties (some tweaking required) and quarterbacks, because it can give them a stable platform and can move in a variety of ways. 

The TTC Strong Prolines can be used for fullbacks, inside linebackers, and linemen to create a player who is a force to be reckoned with in the trenches. As always, some tweaking required. A well tweaked TTC Strong base can be an anchor of your team, weighted on unweighted, for many years. 

 

Edited by NO Dave
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

APW is a system used in MPFL rules🏈

From 2.4 grams to 9 grams 🏈

Example🏈

Running backs 2.4 grams up to 5.5 grams the weight ranges from 155lbs to 245lbs🏈

OL/DL 5.0 grams to 9.0 grams 🏈 250lbs to 300 plus lbs🏈

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
On 6/12/2020 at 6:31 PM, Scott said:

APW is a system used in MPFL rules🏈

From 2.4 grams to 9 grams 🏈

Example🏈

Running backs 2.4 grams up to 5.5 grams the weight ranges from 155lbs to 245lbs🏈

OL/DL 5.0 grams to 9.0 grams 🏈 250lbs to 300 plus lbs🏈

Hi Scott,

Do you know where I can find a copy of the APW guidelines for the MPFL, or for any other leagues? I only know of the FAT8 Conference having APW rules, so it'd be nice to cross reference them so I can develop my own APW system for my solitaire league.

Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Oh yeah, Jamie actually convinced me to take the plunge and get into EF in the first place. I had heard of Electric Football before, and I love strategy games like Stratego and Battleship, but I always thought EF was just a bunch of figures looping aimlessly around or making big dogpiles (oh how foolish I was).

Jamie's vids actually showed me that you can use strategy, formations, routes, etc just like the outside game. I've been subbed for about 2 years now and he seems like a pretty chill dude. He actually lives in my State less than an hour away from me, so if this virus ever goes away I'd definitely like to meet him and shoot the breeze on some strategy and such. 😊

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another thing to note about the Fat 8 APW system is that it's geared towards college sizes, so for modern NFL style players you could probably bump some of the max sizes up about 15 pounds/around half a gram or so. We all know Cam Newton-sized QBs are about 250, Lorenzo Neal-sized fullbacks can be up to 275 or so, etc....😉

Edited by Paul Kian
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I just saw a post from Glenn Mishoe where the APW is based on a calculation of that actual player and I'm loving....Definitely want to try this out...

You take the weight of the player and multiply by either 125% or 150% ( I like 150) then multiply by 1%

Now keep in mind he is using actual players in the league past or present. Love it

player weights.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes indeed.  I have previously elaborated on how much I like the APW system used in the FAT8 system and others.  I am intrigued by Glenn's list as well.  Jamie uses a "floating" scale based largely on position rather than an absolute scale for weight.  In other words, .1g = x lbs for FB's is different than .1g =  y lbs for say linemen or QB's.  I think this "variable compression" is useful, but I wonder if an absolute scale where .1g =  x lbs for ALL positions would be just as good.  I would love to hear Jamie's thoughts on this as I would imagine he's already considered this.  Regardless, it makes for some great variability and I'll tell you a strong invisibase with a 7.0g big boy on them is a force to behold!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, nefgm.org said:

I have considered using 1 gram = 50 lbs. (.1 gram = 5 lbs.)  which would make the average 4.0 gram figure be 200 lbs. Therefore a 300 lb. lineman would be 6.0 grams.  

I think you are on to something here!  A lot of players will end up in the 4.1 gram range however (lots of 200-250lbs NFL athletes).  Not necessarily a bad thing though.  And I bet this is the exact thing others who use variable weights systems wrestle with--how to best create weight disparity without clumping half the team at the same gram weight. 

In my research on this topic I did find a VERY helpful document by a brilliant young student named Cole Blender out of the University of Idaho.  In 2018-19, he compiled a statistical study of the average heights and weights of NFL players based on then current rosters.  What he found was quite illuminating and I really appreciate that he has made his findings public.  Go Vandals! 🙂  For your convenience, I've attached a copy of his final presentation.  I think you'll agree it is a treasure trove of information. 

Avg NFL ht wt.pdf

Edited by The Major
Date correction
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been looking into using something like a "weight-bracket" system, though I don't quite have the numbers figured out.

For example, let's say the first two grams are worth 50lbs and the third gram is something bigger, let's say 75lbs. Unaltered players tend to weigh around 2.2-2.5 grams in my (limited to Tudor Fab 5 figures) experience, so that'd put a baseline player weight of around 135lbs. A bit light for the modern era, but I'm sure there's been at least a handful of older NFL players around that weight in the past.

Then, let's make the 4th and 5th grams worth 100lbs. This would lead to a 4 gram figure weighing 275, and a 5 gram figure weighing 375lb, which is about the top end of a real life football player. I know some people like to play with 6+ gram Monsters, so the numbers can be tilted accordingly.

Any thoughts?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

Posting Guidelines

Please follow the Rules to ensure that the forums promote fun and productive conversations. We value the free flow of information. We can't offer that in what we believe to be an unsafe or illegal environment. See the section on "Selling Unlicensed Products and/or Services". Failure to comply with these rules may result in a ban from the forums. 

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Please review our Terms of Use.