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RickLM30

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Posts posted by RickLM30

  1. I'm not a big fan of dropping linemen into coverage.  I know some pro defenses do it, but not really sure how effective it is, unless you have Kevin Greene type who can play linebacker or defensive end.  I look at it that, for the most part, defensive linemen are defensive linemen for a reason... I prefer just to use various blitz packages with my linebackers, safeties, and sometimes corners.  Note, I use TTQBs and play solitaire.

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  2. I also use enamels, although I use toothpicks to apply them rather than brushes.  I've been doing that for years and it seems to work fine.  I did try acrylics, but as Ravenna Al and zak99b5 said, it takes more coats and you need to use a clear coat on top of it to keep the paint from wearing off.  Enamels chip every once in a while, but are easily touched up.

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  3. Mike, that should have read 120 plays per game at the end of my last post.  I'll learn how math works one of these days! 😊

    Also, I decide before setting up whether it will be a run or a pass.  I have diagrammed running plays and pass plays that I use (some from when I played in high school) and others that can be found on the internet.  I also run RPOs at times as you do.  I also have various defenses to use based on downs and distance, including blitzes and man to man or various zone pass coverages.  Plenty of information for 4-3, 3-4, and various other defenses and coverages are available on the internet and can be incorporated into EF.

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  4. Mike, As far as a multi-stop system goes, there are a lot of choices.  Some coaches only allow 1 or 2 stops total for each play.  I have used a multi-stop system since I started playing EF in 1966.  I started that way because the players ran around willy-nilly when I let the board run.  I didn't know about tweaking the bases back then, and I don't do much tweaking now (probably because I'm too lazy 😊).  I found that if I have a bunch of guys that run straight, a multi-stop system works pretty well. I run the game for about 3 seconds between stops.  At the stops, I adjust all players on the field, to simulate the back reading his blocks, defenders reacting to the ball carrier or pass receivers, flow of the play, etc.  I pivot them around the front of their base.  Some coaches only allow pivoting players not in contact with opponents, but I pivot all of them (offense and defense) to simulate trying to get off a block or trying to continue a block, make a cut in a pass route, etc.  Other coaches have other ways of playing, which are described in other locations in the Forum.  It's really whatever floats your boat.

    As far as clock stoppage goes, I use a set number of plays per quarter rather than run a clock.  It just seems easier for me.  I don't count any plays that would stop the clock as a play, such as out of bounds, incomplete passes, penalties, injuries, and do not count extra points or kickoffs out of the endzone.  Just my system.  The number of plays per game varies among coaches and mine is most likely way out of line.  I use 30 plays per quarter (60 per game).  You may not want to do that, as it takes me  about 3-4 weeks to complete one. 😊  I keep statistics on each game and each player.  I track each player who has played in my league over their career on Excel spreadsheets.  I'm kind of a statistics nerd.  Anyway, just my thoughts on a couple questions you asked earlier. 

    The important thing is to have fun and play the way that is fun for you!

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  5. On 10/27/2021 at 11:49 AM, Capanther said:

    One thing i try to do with electric football is show a little gratitude to yesterdays stars and honor them for providing some great memories to those of us who grew up in the 60s and 70s....the nfl and tudor really took off in that era......metcalf has had a very good tournament for sure....im going to try and play the cards and 49ers tonight.

    Charlie,  I feel the same way.  That is why I enjoy your posts and why my league has so many players from the 60s and 70s.  I have players from 1960 through 1999 on my teams and include many players from the 60s and 70s.  With 55 players on 16 teams, I have plenty of room for the oldies but goodies, as well as some of the younger players.  Thanks for the memories. 😊

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  6. Mike, welcome to the world of EF world.  It is a great hobby.  The boards sometimes need a little tweaking (placement of motors, board support), and the bases usually need some tweaking, but it is still worth the effort in my opinion.  Painting teams is also fun, even at my age when the hands don't always do what I want them to! 😊 There are also various ways to play from just turn it on and let 'em run, to multi-stop methods.  Personally, I use a multi-stop method in my solitaire league, but there are lots of other methods (you can find info on these in the various forum pages.  Also, if you haven't yet, check out nefgm's website.  It has a lot of good and interesting info on the game.  Enjoy, it's a great hobby!

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  7. I have played on all different size boards over the 54 years I've been playing.  Most of my later games have been played on 36x18 fields and I enjoyed playing on them.  Generally, the size of the board does not preclude you from having a great time playing EFL.  I will say that I prefer the larger size boards, just because there is more room to run pass patterns, sweeps, etc. and allows you to spread the defense out a little more to enable your receivers to find the soft spots in zones.  I recently got an Ultimate board (48x24) and it really does give you a lot of room to run sweeps, outs, flags, etc.

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  8. Charlie,

    Growing up, I didn't know anyone else who played electric football.  I moved around a bunch and was always able to find guys to play football, basketball, and baseball on the playgrounds, yards, & streets.  I was introduced to electric football by a classmate when I was in 5th grade and we played on his field almost every weekend for about a year before I moved away.  Finally got my own board about 2 years later and my 2 brothers and I played the heck out of it.  We all ended up with our own boards and played against each other until I went off to college.  I continued to play whenever I was home on break, but they stopped playing when they went to college - their loss.  😊 They left me their boards and players and I set up my own solitaire league, which I have been playing ever since.  It has provided me decades of great fun and enjoyment.

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  9. I agree.  Some dead spots give the receiver a chance to make a move on the db or the ball carrier to juke away from a tackler... At least that's the way I look at it.  And you guys are right no play works the same way each time, even with the same players and bases!  Hmmm, sorta like real football. 😊

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